translate,please

Home | Contact | FB_logo.gif | Print | d | f | i | e

PDO Products

  • Abricotine PDO
    • Abricotine PDO

      Product description:

      Finest eau-de-vie made from apricots of the variety „Luizet“
      Minimum alcohol content 40 % vol.

      Submission of the request: 02.07.1997
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 17.03.2000
      Registration: 06.01.2003


      Branch organisations

      Chambre valaisanne d'agriculture par sa Commission AOP eaux-de-vie
      Maison du Paysan, CP 96
      CH-1964 Châteauneuf-Conthey
      Tel. +41 (0)27 345 40 10
      Mail cvagri@agrivalais.ch

      Web www.eau-de-vie-du-valais.ch >

      Geographical Region

      The production of the fruit, the storage, the fermentation, distillation and bottling take place exclusively within the frontiers of the canton of Wallis. The apricot trees only grow up to an altitude of maximum 1100 meters above sea Level.

      Production

      The Abricotine PDO ist produced mainly from apricots of the variety „Luizet“. Other varieties can be used up to a proportion of maximum 10%. Only the best fruit specimen are processed. They must have reached full maturity, be healthy and cleaned and have a minimum diameter of 35 mm. The fruit must be deseeded in order to avoid a too high level of bitterness of the product. When the fruit is squashed, a homogenous fruit pulp is formed, which allows full fermentation of the sugar. The distillation should follow as soon as possible after the fermentation. The alcohol content is reduced to drinking strenght by means of demineralised water or spring water with a low mineral content.

      History

      In the canton of Wallis the production of fruit eau-de-vie follows a long tradition. The apricot cultivation, in particular the Luizet variety, was long ago established in Wallis. The Luizet variety is said to have been introduced as early as 1838. Distillation of this apricot developed parallel to its cultivation: Initially the product, manufactured by means of numerous private distillers and burners was destined for the private domestic use of the local population and it was marketed only later. Quality evaluations were carried out by establishments in Wallis between 1943 and 1947.

  • Berner Alpkäse PDO and Berner Hobelkäse PDO
    • Berner Alpkäse PDO and Berner Hobelkäse PDO

      Product description:

      Loaf diameter 28 to 48 cm
      Loaf weight 5 to 14 kg
      Hartkäse Berner Alpkäse AOP (Alpine hard cheese PDO) resp.
      Bernese extra hard cheese Hobelkäse PDO (hobel = slice)

      Submission of the request: 28.11.1997
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 30.03.2001
      Registration: 26.04.2004


      Branch organisations

      CasAlp Sortenorganisation Berner Alp- und Hobelkäse AOP
      Inforama Berner Oberland
      3702 Hondrich
      Tel. +41 (0)31 636 04 98
      Mail info@casalp.ch

      Web www.casalp.ch >

      These specialties can be purchased here

      buyfresh

      Geographical Region

      The geographic region includes essentially the summer pastures in the Bernese Oberland, as well as a number of Alps in bordering regions, the year round operation of which, however, is situated in the canton of Bern.

      Production

      The Bernese Alpine cheese PDO ist manufactured daily from raw alpine milk during the summer pastures. The milk cows are fed essentially on fodder growing on the summering pastures. The milk is caseated in a copper kettle which is directly or indirectly heated on wood fire. After pressing the cheese is stored during one day in a saturated salt bath. Thereafter, the loaves are regularly rubbed with salt and some smear water. The Bernese Alpine cheese PDO is cared for during at least two weeks on the summer pasture. At the time of marketing it has reached an age of at least six months. The Bernese Alpine cheese PDO loaves selected for refinement of the Berner Hobelkäse PDO originate exclusively from lots which have reached the „Surchoix“ quality level and which have remained in the geographic region throughout the whole maturing time. The loaves intended for refinement leave the cellar, resp. are rolled out at the earliest after 4.5 months. The rind smear is neatly removed before the loaves are refined during at least another 12 months in a „Gaden“ (dry and cold room) with natural climate, or in an artificially temperature controlled room.

      History

      In the Bernese Oberland Alps the rennet cheese-making started around 1500. Already in the chronic of Stumpf (1548), reference was made to the special quality Alpine cheese from this region, under the designations „Sibenthaler“ and „Saanerkäss“. In the 17th century, the Alpine cheese production in the Bernese Oberland came to be of great scientific importance. Today's manufacture practices differ only insignificantly from what is provided in the Manual of the Alpine cheese dairy. The „Hobelkäse“ follows the the tradition of preservation through drying.

  • Bloder-Sauerkäse PDO
    • Bloder-Sauerkäse PDO

      Product description:

      Block shaped
      Loaf weight 100 g bis 8 kg
      Through the maturing process a gelatinous „fat layer“ growing inwards develops in the sour cheese and which is also edible.
       

      Submission of the request: 20.06.2005
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 01.10.2009
      Registration: 18.02.2010


      Branch organisations

      Geschäftsführer:
      Hans Oppliger
      LZSG Rheinhof
      9465 Salez
      Tel 058 228 24 21
      Mail hans.oppliger@lzsg.ch

      Web www.toggenburgonline.ch/sauerkaese >

      Geographical Region

      The geographic region of the Bloderkäse-Sauerkäse PDO includes twelve municipalities in the canton of St. Gallen (Wartau, Sevelen, Buchs, Grabs, Gams, Sennwald, Wildhaus, Alt St. Johann, Stein, Nesslau-Krummenau, Ebnat-Kappel and Amden) and all municipalities of the Principality of Liechtenstein.

      Production

      The processed milk must not be older than 24 hours and must come from a farm which is situated not further away than 30 km from the manufacturing factory. The milk is skimmed in a natural or mechanical way and filled into a copper or a chrome steel kettle. Thereafter, it is heated to 55° to 69°. When the milk is curdled and becomes gelatinous, it is processed further. According to need, salt is added. Salt is the only additive allowed. The milk is heated again and then filled manually into rectangular shaped containers of plastic, metal or wood. After pressing the cheese is salted again. The Bloderkäse PDO can be wrapped and marketed immediately after production, however, at the latest after 21 days. On the contrary, the maturing process of the sour cheese PDO is subject to a drying process, and it can be wrapped and marketed only after two months.

      History

      According to tradition the manufacture of sour cheese comes from the nomad populations in the East and is probably the most original way of making cheese. It can be traced back to the Middle Age and has preserved itself for centuries in the Principality of Liechtenstein, in Werdenberg and Toggenburg, as well as in Vorarlberg. The Pre-Alpine region is characterised by high rainfall and difficult topographic conditions. Because of the long distance to travel to reach the valley at that time and the lack of roads and means of transporation for the milk, the farmers were obliged to process the milk on location. The manufacture of sour cheese and „Bloderkäse“ was the most appropriate for this purpose.

  • Cardon épineux genevois PDO
    • Cardon épineux genevois PDO

      Product description:

      Cardy (Cardoon) vegetable
      The plants reach a height of 1.5 meters, have numerous fine veines, numerous dorns and silver blue leaves.

      Submission of the request: 06.11.2001
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 17.02.2003
      Registration: 10.10.2003


      Branch organisations

      Association Cynara
      c/o Union Maraîchère de Genève
      16 rue Balvignac
      1227 Carouge
      Tel. +41 (0)22 827 40 00
      Mail umg@umg.ch

      Web www.cardongenevois.com >

      These specialties can be purchased here

      buyfresh

      Geographical Region

      Production, storage, bleaching and conditioning take place exclusively within the frontiers of the canton of Geneva.

      Production

      The „Cardon argenté épineux de Plainpalais“ („Plainpalais Silver Thorny Cardoon“) is the only variety approved for the manufacture of Cardon épineux genevois PDO. The seeds come from mother plants which have been selected by a selection team. The selection is carried out according to specific criteria which represent the particular characteristics of this variety. Seeding and planting take place in spring. The Geneva Thorny Cardoon PDO does not demand any special or systematic plant protection measures. Because of its numerous thorns, however, cultivation, harvest and processing are challenging. In order to avoid a too high level of bitterness in the Geneva Thorny Cardoon PDO it is bleached. After bleaching, the Geneva Thorny Cardoon PDO is cleaned. Green and unpalatable leaf veins are removed. Only the heart of the plant and the shortened leaf veins without leaf blades are used.

      History

      The cultivation of Cardy is based on long tradition in Geneva. The Protestants who had fled in consequence of the Edict of Nantes (1685) and who established themselves in Plainpalais, were well skilled in cultivating vegetables and they grew the seeds they had brought with them of the „Plainpalais Silver Thorny Cardoon “. The Geneva vegetable farmers selected the best plants for the reproduction and improved the growth over the years. The Cardy cultivation is traditional. Since World War Two particular efforts were made to grow the famous variety „Plainpalais Silver Thorny Cardoon“, as we know it today. Among the regions in Europe which still produce Cardy, Geneva is the only one, in which thorny Cardy ist grown. Gratin Geneva Thorny Cardoon with poultry is a traditional Christmas specialty in Geneva.

  • Damassine PDO
    • Damassine PDO

      Product description:

      Finest eau-de-vie from plums of the variety „Damasson rouge“ (red Damson). Minimum alcohol content 40 % vol.

      Submission of the request: 10.07.2002
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 08.07.2005
      Registration: 09.03.2010


      Branch organisations

      Association interprofessionelle de la Damassine
      Alain Perret
      Combe Bruquelin 27
      2900 Porrentruy
      Tel. 032 466 80 03
      Mail alain.perret@damassine.com

      http://www.damassine.org

      Geographical Region

      The production of the red Damson, storage, fermentation, distillation and filling of Damassine are carried out exclusively within the frontiers of the Republic and canton of Jura.

      Production

      The harvest of the red Damson takes place, depending on the region, from mid-July to end of September. The ripened fruits which have fallen from the trees are manually picked up daily. It is prohibited to shake the trees. At the beginning and at the end of the harvest, as well as in case of favourable weather conditions, the fruit can be picked up also every second day. After the fruits have been carefully sorted, they are filled into barrels as soon as possible. Squashing and deseeding are prohibited. Until the moment of distillation the barrels are stored at a temperature of 15° to 25°C. After the alcoholic fermentation the barrels are completely filled with fermented fruit pulp and well sealed. The distillation follows at the latest on 31st December of the year of the red Damson harvest. For the reduction of the alcohol content to 40% vol. only distilled or demineralised water from the production region may be used. Damassine PDO must be stored for at least six months and not be marketed before Martin's Day (11th November) of the year after the harvest.

      History

      Red Damson originates from the Near East and was brought to Europe by the Romans in the 13th century. The cultivation of the plum in the Jurassic region is mentioned for the first time 1860. Towards the end of the 19th century cultivated and non cultivated trees grew next to each other. In the course of time the plum has adapted to the climate and soil conditions in the region and has developed into a fruit whose characteristics are specific for the canton of Jura. Red Damson was in fact always used for the preparation of cakes and jams, however, the distillation process of Damassine PDO was and is the most important use.

  • Emmentaler PDO
    • Emmentaler PDO

      The Emmentaler PDO is not a member of the Swiss PDO-PGI Association.

      Product description:

      Hartkäse aus roher Kuhmilch
      Durchmesser: 80 bis 100 cm, Höhe: 16 bis 27 cm
      Gewicht: 75 bis 120 kg
      Lochung: 2 bis 4 cm Durchmesser

      Submission of the request: 28.06.2000
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 05.08.2002
      Registration: 06.10.2002

      Branch organisations

      Emmentaler Switzerland
      Kapellenstrasse 28
      Postfach
      CH-3001 Bern
      Tel.+41 (0)31 388 42 42
      Mail info@emmentaler.ch

      Web www.emmentaler.ch >

      Geographical Region

      The region of the Emmentaler PDO includes the cantons of Aargau, Bern (without the administrative district of Moutier), Glarus, Luzern, Schwyz, Solothurn, St. Gallen, Thurgau, Zug and Zurich, as well as the Lake and Sense district in the canton of Freiburg.p>

      Production

      For the production of Emmentaler PDO only fresh raw milk from farmers' entreprises in the vicinity of the cheese dairy is used. The raw milk, as well as special feeding regulations, for example the silage prohibition, result in a valuable crude milk raw material, which gives the cheese its characteristic, unique and aromatic aroma. For 1 kg of Emmentaler 12 litres of milk are necessary. Bacteria cultures and rennet are added to the heated milk. The natural bacteria cultures later ensure the fermentation and the maturing of the cheese. The rennet makes the milk curdle. The use of rennet substances and cultures originating from genetically modified organisms ist prohibited. The freshly manufactured cheese loaves are pressed under increasing hydraulic pressure (up to approx. 2000 kg) and turned automatically several times for about 20 hours. In the pressing process the remaining excess whey is pressed through the fine screening sheets of the mould. During this time the milk sugar ferments to milk acid. After pressing the loaves are placed into a salt bath. Here they stay for two days, absorb the salt and eliminate the water. In the process the first layer of crust forms which gives the cheese loaf its stability. The young cheese loaves stay for 5-20 days in the cold salt bath cellar at a temperature of 12-16°C, then 6-8 weeks at a temperature of 19-24°C in the warm fermentation cellar. The warmth of the fermentation cellar induces the propionic acid fermentation. In the process carbonic acid develops which cannot escape and which concentrates in those spots in the cheese where the holes can be found later. After the time spent in the fermentation cellar the loaves are throughly cleaned and stored in the storage cellar at 11-14°C until they are delivered to the cheese market. In the fermentation cellar the loaves are often turned, in the colder storage cellar only once a week. The loaves weighing 75-120 kg stay in the storage cellar of the cheese dairy until they are three months old. Thereafter they are picked up by the cheese retailer and continue to mature in the big storage cellars of the trading firms. The Emmentaler is not ready for consumption before the age of four months at the earliest. The longer the maturing time the more intensive the aroma of the carefully herded and cared for Emmentaler loaf.

      History

      In the 17th and 18th centuries the so-called cowherd system in the canton of Bern lead to a strong expansion of the cheese production. The cowherd system is based on the current right in Emmental of the youngest son to take over the farm, undivided. Older brothers were bought out and were left with money, but without a property. A lot of these devoted themselves as so-called cowherds to the cheese production. Also the promotion of the economy was favourably disposed towards the cheese. The aristocrats in Bern supported the expansion of the milk economy. The first cheese factory in the valley came into being in 1813 in Kiesen. From 1815 it was also the first factory to be run as a cooperative (today it hosts the national dairy museum). In the following centuries a large number of cheese factories in the valleys were built. From 1840 on the Emmentaler production expanded into further regions in the German speaking part of Switzerland. Parallel to the increased offer, an intensive export activity developed. In the commercial centres of the Bernese Mittelland, big storage cellars for the Emmentaler were built, the trading companies rapidly increased in number. The widely free world trade, as well as innovations such as railways, big shipping lines and the telegraph largely facilitated the export. With the creation of the import duties on agricultural products the export of Swiss cheese was stunted, and with the First World War outbreak completely stopped by the Swiss Federal Council for the benefit of the national economic supply. Subsequently the cheese branch founded a self-help organisation in 1914, then the Swiss Cheese Union. It is subject to the supervision of the Swiss Confederation. Therewith a cheese market organisation for the Emmentaler was established for the first time. After 1945 the Emmentaler remained a cheese marketed by the state regarding quantity and price. The produced amount increased continously to the peak level of approx. 58'000 tons in 1985. The number of dairies that manufactured the Emmentaler experienced in this century a wave motion. From 1960, however, a continuous decrease could be noticed, which was emphasised in the nineties. As the proceeds from export were not cost covering, the semigovernmental cheese union showed a deficit in the nineties which amounted to several hundred million francs each time and which were financed by the Confederation. After the dissolution of the cheese union milk producers, milk processors and the trade companies founded the branch organisation „Emmentaler Switzerland“ in order to position and assert themselves on the currently free market. After submission of the PDO request by Emmentaler Switzerland the Federal court declared, on 25th September 2006, the PDO label of the Emmentaler legally valid, retroactively from 26th July 2002.

  • L'Etivaz PDO
    • L'Etivaz PDO

      Product description:

      Diameter of the loaves 30 to 65 cm
      Weight of the loaves 10 to 38 kg
      Hard cheese
      Enjoyed as sliced cheese or in form of sliced cheese rolls

      Submission of the request: 19.06.1997
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 06.10.1999
      Registration: 02.03.2000


      Branch organisations

      Coopérative des producteurs de fromages d'alpages «l'Etivaz»
      CH-1831 L'Etivaz
      Tel. +41 (0)26 924 62 81
      Mail cooperative@etivaz-aop.ch

      Web www.etivaz-aop.ch >

      These specialties can be purchased here

      buyfresh

      Geographical Region

      The production and processing zone includes the summer pastures, the production sites of which are situated at an altitude between 1'000 and 2'000 m in the following municipalities: Château-d'Oex, Rougemont, Rossinière, Ollon, Villeneuve, Ormont-Dessus, Ormont- Dessous, Corbeyrier, Leysin and Bex. All cheeses are refined in the cellars of the "Coopérative des producteurs de fromage d'alpage L'Etivaz".

      Production

      The L'Etivaz PDO is an Alpine cheese and manufactured only during the summer pasture period from 10th May to 10th October. The roughage fed to the milk cows consists uniquely in natural Alpine grass and herbs. The food quality influences the milk aroma and thus that of the cheese. The l'Etivaz PDO is manufactured from raw milk according to the local, traditional process in the copper kettle. It is heated exclusively over the wood fire. The cheese loaves remain at least one week at the summer pasture where they are regularly salted and scrubbed before they are brought to the cellar in L'Etivaz. During the maturing process each loaf develops its characteristic aromas, marked by the Alpine flora as well as by a typical, leight smokey note. The cheese loaves mature for at least 5 months on spruce board. The most beautiful samples are dried in a storage shed with natural climate for three years and are then refined to „Hobelkäse“.

      History

      The manufacture of Hartkäse (hard cheese) in the region of Pays-d'Enhaut is documented for the first time in the 12th century. The oldest emblems of mountain cheese producers still active today can be traced back to the 17th century. Since the 18th century the district of Pays-d'Enhaut has specialised in the manufacture of cheese intended for marketing outside the production zone. The mountain cheese producers created in 1934 a maturing and marketing cooperation in order to be independent and market their product themselves. By voluntarily sticking to a strict manufacture regulation, the producers has made L'Etivaz PDO a popular Alpine cheese.

  • Eau-de-vie de poire du Valais PDO
    • Eau-de-vie de poire du Valais PDO

      Product description:

      Finest eau-de-vie from pears of the Williams variety
      Minimum alcohol content 40 % vol.

      Submission of the request: 02.07.1997
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 06.10.1999
      Registration: 21.12.2001


      Branch organisations

      Chambre valaisanne d'agriculture
      Maison du Paysan
      CP 96
      CH 1964 Châteauneuf-Conthey
      Tel. +41 (0)27 345 40 10
      Mail nelly.claeyman@agrivalais.ch

      Web www.eau-de-vie-du-valais.ch >

      Geographical Region

      The production of the fruit, the storage, fermentation, distillation and the filling take place exclusively within the frontiers of the canton of Wallis.

      Production

      Only the pear of the Williams variety may be used for the manufacture of Eau-de-vie de poire du Valais AOP / Valais Pear Eau de Vie PDO. The fruit must be harvested when it is ripe. The ripening of the pears takes place in small boxes until the fruit is ripe enough to be macerated. Before processing the fruit is carefully sorted. The fruit must be yellow and juicy and present a minimum diameter of 52.5 mm. It may show no mould, no decay, nor may it contain any fouling. To allow complete fermentation of the sugar the fruit is processed to a homogenous mash. The distillation should follow as soon as possible after the fermentation. The alcohol content is lowered to drinking strength by means of demineralised water or spring water with low mineral content. Before it arrives in commerce, the Valais Pear Eau de Vie PDO is stored for at least 6 months.

      History

      In Wallis the production of fruit brandy goes back to long tradition. Also pear cultivation is long established here. The Williams variety was introduced at the beginning of the last century. In 1945 an eau-de-vie was made exclusively from Williams pears. From having been the way to use the fruit which was unsuitable for the table, the Valais Pear Eau de Vie PDO became the principal use of this pear variety in Wallis over the years.

  • Formaggio d'Alpe Ticinese PDO
    • Formaggio d'Alpe Ticinese PDO

      The Formaggio d'Alpe Ticinese PDO is not a member of the Swiss PDO-PGI Association.

      Product description:

      Round loaf with a diameter of 25 to 50 cm and a thickness of 6 to 10 cm
      Weight 3 to 10 kg
      Semi-hard cheese
      Contains up to 30% goat milk

      Submission of the request: 17.11.1998
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 21.02.2002
      Registration: 06.06.2002


      Branch organisations

      Societa ticinese di economia alpstre STEA, c/o Nadia Scalmanini, 6955 Cagiallo nadiasca@bluewin.ch

      Geographical Region

      The production and processing area includes the summer pastures listed in the specifications, the municipalities of the canton of Ticino from 1st June to 30th September.

      Production

      The Ticino Alpine cheese PDO (Formaggio d'alpe ticinese) is manufactured daily in a copper kettle, principally from raw cow's milk. As summer pastures with goats are tradition in Ticino the use was born to mix both milk sorts before the cheese manufacture. According to the specifications, 30% goat's milk may be added. The rich Alpine flora, which feeds the cows and goats, gives the cheese subtle aromas. The freshly pressed loaves are plunged into a salt bath for 24 hours. Until the descent from the Alps all loaves are pre-matured on spruce and larch plank. Minimum maturing time is 45 days.

      History

      The first written evidence of the fact that the use of the Alps was already firmly anchored in rural society of the Ticino region and therefore Alpine cheese was being produced at that time, dates back to the 12th century. The absolute necessity to use the entire territory forced the inhabitants of the Alpine regions to move all their cattle to higher land for cheese production in the summer. By doing this they gradually settled on different levels of the same Alp. The great distance from populated areas and the necessity to manufacture products which could be preserved for a long time and be easily be transported to the winter settlements. In his description of Italian-speaking part of Switzerland from 1783 to 1987, Schinz mentions the cheese and use of the Alps in districts of the canton of Ticino, where this product was being made.

  • Glarner Alpkäse PDO
    • Glarner Alpkäse PDO

      Product description:

      Submission of the request: 04.03.2011
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 30.01.2014
      Registration: 17.09.2013


      Branch organisations

      Glarona Käsegenossenschaft Ygrubenstrasse 9 8750 Glarus Tel. +41 (0)55 650 28 40, Fax. +41 (0)55 650 28 38 Mail glarona@bluewin.ch

      Web www.glarona.ch >

      These specialties can be purchased here

      buyfresh

      Geographical Region

      The The Alpine cheese of Glarus is a full-fat semi-hard cheese made from raw, non-silage milk with a firm and trimmed greasy crust (marks), manufactured only in summer right on the summer pastures by trained „Senten“ (cowherds). It is round, has a diameter of 28-32 cm and weighs 5-9 kg. As it gets older, it forms a dry, greasy layer. The fresh and tasty raw milk is traditionally caseated while it is still warm and without travelling long distances. The production of the Alpine cheese of Glarus is limited to the customary duration of the summer pasture, but not before 1st May and not after 30th September.

      Production

      History

  • Gruyère PDO
    • Gruyère PDO

      Product description:

      Hard cheese made from raw cow's milk
      Diameter: 55 to 65 cm
      Thickness: 9.5 to 12 cm
      Weight: 25 to 45 kg

      Submission of the request: 22.01.1998
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 06.10.1999
      Registration: 12.07.2001


      Branch organisations

      Interprofession du Gruyère
      Maison du Gruyère
      Case Postale 12
      CH-1663 Pringy
      Tel. +41 (0)26 921 84 10
      Mail interprofession@gruyere.com

      Web www.gruyere.com >

      Geographical Region

      The geographical region includes the cantons of Freiburg, Waadt, Neuenburg and Jura, as well as the districts of Courtelary, La Neuveville, Moutier and the Bernese municipalities of Ferenbalm, Guggisberg, Mühleberg, Münchenwiler, Rüschegg and Wahlern, as well as other cheese dairies in the German-speaking part of Switzerland.

      Production

      The Gruyere PDO owes its delicacy and characteristic taste to the first class raw milk from cows who are feed on fresh grass in the summer and hay in the winter. Added to that are the Know-how passed on from one generation to the next and the experience of the master cheese-makers and the affineurs. For the manufacture of a loaf of Gruyere PDO weighing about 35 kg it takes not less than 400 litres of fresh milk which is delivered twice a day. Each cheese is systematically labelled with the number of the loaf and the one of the cheese dairy. Manufacture date is always marked on the loaf. The black markings (also called cheese passport) are fixed by means of the cheese protein casein. Here neighter foreign nor artificial substances are used. The Gruyere PDO label and the number of the manufacturing dairy are marked on the surface of the loaf. This way the authenticity of a Gruyere PDO can be guaranteed and misuse prevented. The indications are marked in a relief-like manner in the surface of the loaf by means of a branding iron. This marking gives the Gruyere PDO its identity and ensures its origin can be traced back at any time. During the slow maturing period in the refining cellars, which lasts several months, the loaves are regularly turned and washed with a mix of salt and water. Maturing lasts between 5 and 18 months. Humidity allows the formation of a cheese crust, also known as „Schmiere“ („grease“); it protects the interior of the loaf, thus giving the Gruyere PDO its racy aroma. It is no coincidence that this authentic gift from Nature is appreciated by cheese connoisseurs all over the world.

      History

      Already in 1655 the cheese today known to us as Gruyere PDO was named after the district of the canton of Freiburg with the same name, gruière. According to a source, cheese is said to have been marketed in Freiburg from 1249 on. In 1762, the Académie française includes the word ‚Gruyère' in its dictionary, together with the note that it concerns a cheese produced in the Gruyere region. Since the 19th century, efforts have been made to protect the Gruyere, as it was so frequently imitated due to its excellent reputation. It was not until 2001, however, that it finally obtained an efficient protection against imitations thanks to the PDO. Comment The Gruyere PDO is available in the retail trade everywhere. Five months' maturing time is ncessary for a mild, a little over eight months for a medium ripe, approximately ten months for a recent and at least twelve months for a Gruyere surchoix PDO.

  • Munder Safran PDO
    • Munder Safran PDO

      The Munder Safran PDO is not a member of the Swiss PDO-PGI Association.

      Product description:

      Spice derived from the dried stigmas of the Crocus sativus L.
      The stigmas are deep red (purple), fragile, always curved and end in a funnel-like form
      Dried, they are 10 to 45 mm long

      Submission of the request: 15.11.2000
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 16.03.2004
      Registration: 02.07.2004


      Branch organisations

      Safranzunft
      Daniel Jeitziner, Zunftmeister
      3903 Mund
      Tel. +41 (0)27 923 50 08

      Geographical Region

      The processing, drying and preparation of the stigmas take place exclusively in the municipalities of Mund, Birgisch, Naters, Brig-Glis, Betten, Bitsch, Bister, Filet, Gondo/Zwischbergen, Mörel, Riederalp, Ried-Brig, Simplon-Dorf and Termen. The cultivation region of Munder saffron PDO is limited to the meadows of the commune of Mund in the canton of Wallis.

      Production

      Munder saffron PDO is exclusively extracted from high quality crocus bulbs of the variety Crocus sativus L. All working steps of cultivation, harvest and drying of the stigmas are carried out manually, just as formerly. The planting of the bulbs must always take place at the latest at mid-September. The harvest of the flowers must be done exclusively by hand, from September to November, in a lapse of time not exceeding tree days after blossoming. The stigmas are removed from the flowers with the finger nails at the latest at the same day. They are dried in the open air for at least 48 hours, protected from the light. For storage, only small cans of glass are used. To obtain one gram of the sought after spice, almost 180 flowers are necessary.

      History

      Earlier, saffron was cultivated in several regions of Switzerland. Saffron culture is mentioned for the first time in the 14th century, in Basel. The saffron culture is based on long tradition in Oberwallis. In the communal archives the saffron cultures in Mund are mentioned for the first time 1870, but probably saffron was already cultivated there earlier. Today saffron culture exists in Mund only, where it continues to attract the interest of a great majority of the inhabitants. These have united to form a guild with the aim of preserving the local saffron production. The cultivation ist operated on a total surface of about 14'000 m2. Comment The harvest is marketed mainly through direct selling or handled by the shops and restaurants in the region.

  • Poire à Botzi PDO
    • Poire à Botzi PDO

      Product description:

      The fruit is marketed as fresh or canned fruit. It is small and has a diameter of 35 to 55 mm. The rind varies from green to red-brown, the fruit pulp has a colour going from white to dark yellow.

      Submission of the request: 20.08.1999
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 08.07.2005
      Registration: 05.10.2007


      Branch organisations

      Union fruitière fribourgeoise
      Secrétariat c/o Service d'arboriculture Grangeneuve
      CH-1725 Posieux
      Tel. +41 (0)26 305 58 66
      Mail info@poire-a-botzi.ch

      Web www.poire-a-botzi.ch >

      Geographical Region

      The zone includes the canton of Freiburg up to an altitude of 900 meters. Part of it are the Bernese enclaves Clavaleyres and Münchenwiler, as well as the districts of Avenches and Payerne and the municipalities Yvonand and Dompierre.

      Production

      La Poire à Botzi AOP (The Botzi pear PDO) originates from a local, unique pear variety, the „Büschelibirne“ (Poire à botzi). The variety is rather difficult to cultivate, as it grows very erect and its fructification is delicate and slow. The traditional Know-how of the fruit farmers is therefore of great importance. One team selects the branches which serve the reproduction. The type of culivation and the form of the trees can be freely chosen; they are in all cases, however, subject to the rules of the integrated, or bio cultivation. Harvest takes place between the beginning of August until the middle of September. The colour of the Botzi pear PDO varies from green to brown-red, with red „cheeks“. The fruit scent is harmonic with a note of green apples or freshly cut grass, fermentating or ripe fruit, combined with notes of spirits and caramel. Its taste is rather sweet with little acid and a light bitterness. As the Botzi pear PDO cannot be preserved for a long time, it is necessary to bottle it with sugar water.

      History

      The Botzi pear PDO probably originates from Italy and was introduced by mercenary soldiers at the Papal Guard over 300 years ago. The name Poire à Botzi/Botzi pear originates from the patois spoken in French-speaking Freiburg and means cluster, or in grapes, as the pears grow in clusters. The Botzi pear PDO is served with the traditional, sumptuous Chilbi menue, which is served every year after the descent from the Alps. The pears are bottled with caramelised sugar and accompany the lamb gigot or ragout. The Botzi pear was menaced by disappearance together with the tradition of the original orchards. However, it could be preserved thanks to several initiatives.

  • Rheintaler Ribelmais PDO
    • Rheintaler Ribelmais PDO

      Product description:

      Product from the mill manufactured from Rheintaler Ribelmais AOP/PDO
      Weiss-White-beige colour
      Sweetish and intensive taste, typical for corn

      Submission of the request: 06.02.1998
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 06.10.1999
      Registration: 14.08.2000


      Branch organisations

      Verein Rheintaler Ribelmais
      Landwirtschaftliches Zentrum St. Gallen
      CH-9465 Salez
      Tel. 058 228 24 22
      Mail rolf.kuenzler@lzsg.ch

      Web www.ribelmais.ch >

      Geographical Region

      The geographical region includes the St. Gallen districts of Unterrheintal, Oberrheintal, Werdenberg, Sargans, the Grison municipalities Fläsch, Maienfeld, Landquart, Jenins, Malans, Zizers, Untervaz, as well as the Principality of Liechtenstein.

      Production

      The Rheintaler Ribelmais PDO is produced from an old, open-pollinated country corn variety of great genetic diversity, still maintained today. The sowing takes place at mid-May at the latest. Harvest takes place at the end of October / beginning of November and can be done manually or by means of combine harvesters. The corn grains are washed in the mill. Subsequently the corn is ground on rollers or in a stoneground until it reaches the desired fineness. The Rheintaler Ribelmais PDO is either a mix of semolina, coarse-grained flour and flour, or a mix of corn semolina and corn coarse-grained flour, an individual product of corn semolina or corn coarse-grained flour.

      History

      The beginnings of the corn cultivation in the Rhine Valley are difficult to specify. The spreading of the corn passed over Italy. In the origins and the documents of the Rhine Valley, the corn appeared regularly for food purposes since the middle of the 17th century. In the 19th century the corn of the Rhine Valley became the most important type of cereal as basic food. With the beginning of the 20th century, with exception for the two World War periods, the cereal culture surface in the Rhine Valley, corn included, diminished continuously. In 1997, the cultivation of the corn variety used for the Rheintaler Ribelmais PDO still amounted to about 4 hectares, whereby a large part was used for self supply. Extra hard, full-fat cheese from raw cow's milk.

  • Sbrinz PDO
    • Sbrinz PDO

      Product description:

      Extraharter, vollfetter Käse aus roher Kuhmilch
      Diameter: 45 to 65 cm, thickness: 14 to 17 cm
      Weight: 25 to 45 kg
      Served as Möckli, sliced roll or grating cheese

      Submission of the request: 14.12.1998
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 15.01.2002
      Registration: 24.04.2002


      Branch organisations

      Sbrinz Käse GmbH
      Merkurstrasse 2
      6210 Sursee
      Tel. +41 (0)41 914 60 60
      Mail info@sbrinz.ch

      Web www.sbrinz.ch >

      Geographical Region

      The geographical region includes the cantons of Luzern, Schwyz, Ob- and Nidwalden, Zug, the district of Muri (canton of Aargau) and the municipalities Obersteckholz, Lotzwil and Langenthal (canton of Bern). In the districts of See, Gaster and Neutoggenburg of the canton of St. Gallen the milk draw areas of the cheese dairies Walde, Steinenbrücke and Schönenberg.

      Production

      Sbrinz PDO is today manufactured commercially in selected cheese dairies in the valley and on the Alps. For the production a loaf of Sbrinz PDO of 45 kilos, a little over 600 litres fresh raw milk are necessary. The feed rations of the milk cows consists mainly of grass (in summer) and hay (in winter). Ensilage of all kinds is prohibited. The recipe has been passed on for centuries: Raw milk, salt and rennet. After the cheese manufacture the loaves are stored for at least 15 days in a salt bath and conserved. Subsequently the cheese is first matured in drying and left to sweat in a moderately heated cellar, then, in a colder storage cellar it is stored dry upright and cared for for at least 16 months until it has reached consumption maturity.

      History

      According to records in the Record Office in Bern the hard cheese manufactured traditionally in Central Switzerland was already in the 16th century brought to Brienz, the most important transshipment point, in order to be exported from there. Different historical sources mention that the Italians named the cheese after the trade centre Brienz, thus letting the designation Sbrinz come into existance.

      Comment
      p>

  • Tête de Moine PDO
    • Tête de Moine PDO

      Product description:

      Cylindrical loaf of 10 to 15 cm diameter
      Weight 0.7 to 0.9 kg
      Semi-hard cheese
      The cheese is scraped to fine rosettes by means of a girolle (scraper).

      Submission of the request: 17.12.1998
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 23.01.2001
      Registration: 08.05.2001


      Branch organisations

      Interprofession Tête de Moine
      Rue de l'Envers 16
      2610 St-Imier
      Tel. +41 (0)32 941 77 77
      Mail info@tetedemoine.ch

      Web www.tetedemoine.ch >

      These specialties can be purchased here

      buyfresh

      Geographical Region

      The geographical region includes the mountain area and the summer pastures enclosed therein, the districts of the Freiberge, Pruntrut, Moutier und Courtelary, the municipality Saulcy, as well as the parcel of land belonging to the cheese dairy Courgenay.

      Production

      The Tête de Moine AOP/PDO, Fromage de Bellelay, is produced from raw milk. In summer, the milk cows are fed mainly on grass, in winter on hay. The administering of silage food is prohibited over the whole year. The milk must be processed within 24 hours after milking. It is caseated in a copper kettle. After pressing of the cheese curd the cheese loaf is tagged with a casein mark to ensure traceability and plunged into a salt water bath for at least 12 hours. During the maturing time the cheese is regularly treated with salt water. Each loaf must mature for at least 75 days on spruce plank in the geographical region.

      History

      Tête de Moine as designation has been known since about 1790. However, the cheese has a much longer history. Already in 1192 the monks in Bellelay Abbey were mentioned for their cheese for the first time. With the invention of the girolle by a Jurassian precision mechanic in 1981 a new chapter of the Tête de Moine history was initiated. Since the day it was introduced, it has been sold 2.5 million times.

  • Vacherin Fribourgeois PDO
    • Vacherin Fribourgeois PDO

      Product description:

      Semi-hard cheese from raw or thermised milk
      Diameter: 30 to 40 cm
      Thickness: 6 to 9 cm
      Weight: 6 to 10 kg

      Submission of the request: 22.08.1997
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 08.07.2005
      Registration: 28.02.2006


      Branch organisations

      Interprofession du Vacherin Fribourgeois
      Rue Condémine 56
      1630 Bulle 2
      Tel. +41 (0)26 919 87 50
      Mail ipvf@federation-patronale.ch

      Web www.vacherin-fribourgeois-aop.ch >

      Geographical Region

      The geographical region includes the canton of Freiburg, as well as the Bernese municipalities Clavaleyres and Münchenwiler.

      Production

      The Vacherin fribourgeois AOP/PDO is manufactured in a copper kettle. The milk must be processed at the latest 24 hours after milking. The milk cows are fed on natural fodder in summer and winter. In order to ensure traceability, each freshly manufactured cheese loaf is taggedd with a casein mark. After production the fresh cheeses are plunged into a salt water bath to ensure they are non-perishable. Subsequently they are stored on spruce plank in maturing cellars and regularly treated with salt water. To ensure that the rather soft cheese loaves remain compact, they are wrapped in a gauze fabric only a few days after manufacture. The maturing process of the cheese lasts for at least 63 days. The Vacherin fribourgeois PDO is appreciated beyond its regional frontiers as fondue ingredient. A creamy, soft texture and a slightly sour taste, as well as a very good melting capacity are the typical characteristics of the Vacherin fribourgeois PDO. As one of the rare semi-hard cheeses it melts already at a temperature of approx. 5°C, which can be attributed to the special acidification during the maturing period.

      History

      We encounter the name of the Vacherin fribourgeois for the first time in legal texts from 1420. Already centuries ago cattle breeding was practised and cheese was manufactured in the Alps at the time. According to language specialists, the word Vacherin should come from the Latin vaccarinus (small cowherd). The small cowherd supports the herders (vaccarius) on the Alp by milking and looking after the cows (vacca). As was the case with a lot of other types of cheese the production of the Vacherin Fribourgeois was for a long time limited to a specific season. Thus the milk was processed to Vacherin only just in the spring, when the herd was still modest, and especially in the autumn, towards the end of the summer pastures, when the milk quantity was no longer sufficient for the production of big Gruyere loaves.

      Comment
      The Vacherin fribourgeois PDO is available in specialised shops and in food departments everywhere. It is used especially in fondue mix or as semi-hard cheese.

  • Vacherin Mont-d'Or PDO
    • Vacherin Mont-d'Or PDO

      Product description:

      Round form in four sizes
      Weight 350 g to 3 kg
      Slightly fluid soft cheese with a washed, slightly undulated crust
      The cheese is kept together by a ring of spruce bark and stored in a spruce wood box.

      Submission of the request: 05.10.1998
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 17.05.2001
      Registration: 16.06.2003


      Branch organisations

      Interprofession du Vacherin Mont-d'Or
      Rue Grenade 40
      CH 1510 Moudon
      Tel. +41 (0)21 905 81 51
      Mail vacherinmontdor@bluewin.ch

      Web www.vacherin-montdor.ch >

      Geographical Region

      The geographical region includes the Vallée de Joux, as well as the foot of the Waadtländer Jura. Part of the area are the districts of Vallée de Joux, Orbe, Grandson, Aubonne, Cossonay and Morges, as well as the municipalities of Orges and Vugelles-la-Mothe of the Yverdon district, the Alps of the municipalities of Bassins, Le Vaud, Arzier and St-Cergue, as well as a number of French-Swiss Alps.

      Production

      From 15th August to 31st March the Vacherin Mont-d'Or AOP/PDO is produced from milk delivered twice a day to the cheese dairy. Feeding the milk cows with fermented fodder is prohibited. The milk ist thermised by means of a gentle process. After pressing of the curd the cheeses are wrapped in a band of spruce bark and plunged into a salt bath for 2 to 4 hours. The white cheese (young cheese without a greasy crust) is placed on spruce plank at the latest 48 hours after manufacture start. Then the cheeses are turned daily until the first washing, which should be done at the latest after the surface of the chese be covered by a mould. The cheese is regularly washed and turned during at least 17 days. At the end of the refining the cheeses are packed in a wooden box, the diameter of which must be a little smaller than that of the cheese, to enable the desired undulation of the crust.

      History

      Legend wants it that during the War or 1870 a French soldier brought the secret of the production of Vacherin Mont-d'Or with him and disclosed it to his entourage after he had settled in Les Charbonnières. However, the law of 6th June 1812 on road taxes mentions the Vacherin unter the heading „Cheese“. A manuscript of a bar-keeper in Les Charbonnières from the year of 1823 and an account book from 1845 also records purchases and deliveries of this cheese. On the Alps of Vallée de Joux small cheeses were manufactured towards the end of the season, when there was less milk available. These were designated as „Vacherins“. In the 19th century the designation „Vacherin“ was gradually replaced by „Mont-d'Or“ or „Vacherin Mont-d'Or“, as it appears in numerous documents.

  • Walliser Raclette PDO
    • Walliser Raclette PDO

      Product description:

      Semi-hard cheese produced from raw cow's milk
      Round loaves with a diameter of 29 to 31 cm
      Weight: approx. 5 kg
      The cheese is used as semi-hard cheese, melted as raclette or sliced

      Submission of the request: 01.07.1998
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 15.11.2001
      Registration: 21.12.2007


      Branch organisations

      Interprofession du Raclette du Valais AOP
      Avenue de la Gare 2
      1964 Conthey
      Tel. +41 (0)27 345 40 10
      Mail info@walliserraclette.ch

      Web www.walliserraclette.ch >

      Geographical Region

      The geographical zone includes the frontiers of the canton of Wallis.

      Production

      The Raclette du Valais AOP/PDO is produced from raw milk, which is delivered twice a day to the cheese factory. Feeding the cows with silage fodder is prohibited. The milk is processed in a copper kettle. The fresh cheese is rubbed with salt or plunged in a salt bath for 24 hours. During maturing time, which lasts for at least 3 months, placed on planks of red spruce the loaves are regularly washed and turned. The Raclette du Valais PDO can be marketed as Hobelkäse (to be sliced) after 9 months maturing time.

      History

      The first signs of the cheese date back to the time 400 years b.C. In the Roman period the cheese became a means of payment. Already in 1574 cheese was melted in Wallis. The expression „raclette“ comes from a local dialect and also became from 1874 the official nomination of the cheese.

  • Walliser Roggenbrot PDO
    • Walliser Roggenbrot PDO

      Product description:

      Round sourdough bread made of minimum 90% rye flour with a crisp crust
      Weight 500 g or 1 kg

      Submission of the request: 27.08.1997
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 24.05.2000
      Registration: 29.01.2004


      Branch organisations

      Association pain de seigle valaisan AOP
      Maison du Paysan
      CP 96
      CH1964 Conthey
      Tel. +41 (0)27 345 40 10
      Mail paindeseiglevalaisan@agrivalais.ch

      Web www.walliserroggenbrot.ch >

      These specialties can be purchased here

      buyfresh

      Geographical Region

      The geographical region is the canton of Wallis. The production of the cereal (rye and wheat) and its processing to flour and bread must take place in the geographical region.

      Production

      The flour used for the production of Walliser Roggenbrot AOP/PDO must be a wholemeal flour which contains at least 90 per cent rye and maximum 10 per cent wheat. The cereal are cultivated in an environmentally compatible way. Rye and wheat flour, yeast, salt and water are the only used raw materials. All ingredients are kneaded to a homogenous dough. After being mixed, the dough must rest in boxes until its volume has approximately doubled. Subsequently pieces of dough weighing approximatively 600 g resp. 1200 g are weighed, formed to a pointed cone and turned around in flour. After that the pieces of dough are left to rest until distinct cracks appear. To reinforce the cracks the ends are slightly flattened by hand before baking. The Walliser Roggenbrot PDO is baked in hearth ovens. Temperature and duration of the baking (about an hour) depend on the Know-how of the baker.

      History

      The cultivation of rye in Europe dates back to the Bronze Age. The processing of rye to bread in the Alps was documented by Pliny the Elder. Scripts testify the importance of the rye bread already in 1209: Rye bread was the main ingredient of the daily sustenance in the Wallis villages. The continental climate and the light and dry soils present favourable conditions for the rye cultivation. The rye is the only cereal adapting to such extreme production conditions and highly placed locations. In the Wallis villages the oven used for the collective bread baking was activated only twice or three time a year. Therefore, products had to be well preserved, just as the Walliser rye bread. It can be enjoyed together with cheese, just as well as dried meat and a glass of Dôle or Goron.

  • Zuger Kirsch / Rigi Kirsch PDO
    • Zuger Kirsch / Rigi Kirsch PDO

      Product description:

      Finest all-natural fruit distillates from cherries with a minimum alcohol content of 40 % vol.p>

      Submission of the request: 26.07.2010
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 02.09.2013
      Registration: 02.05.2013


      Branch organisations

      Verein Zuger & Rigi Chriesi
      Schöngrund 26
      CH-6343 Rotkreuz
      Tel. +41 (0)41 780 13 69
      Mail kontakt@zuger-rigi-chriesi.ch

      Web www.zuger-rigi-chriesi.ch >

      These specialties can be purchased here

      buyfresh

      Geographical Region

      The geographical region of production includes the entire canton of Zug, as well as nine municipalities in the canton of Schwyz and seven in the canton of Luzern, around the Rigi.

      Production

      The Zuger Kirsch AOP/PDO and the Rigi Kirsch AOP/PDO have been successfully produced and exported worldwide in the region Zug-Rigi for at least 150 years, unmixed or as an assemblage of old cherry varieties used for distilling kirsch. In the Zug-Rigi region a large variety of cherry varieties have always been cultivated, which has generated the richness which characterises the Zuger Kirsch and the Rigi Kirsch, with flavour nuances as „sweet“, „nuttiness“, „marzipan“ or „spice“. Zuger Kirsch and Rigi Kirsch distinguish themselves by a typical almond note, which comes from the use of the typical regional small fruit varieties with the high pit content connected with the raw material.

      History

      In the Zug-Rigi region the documentary sources show a cherry culture tradition which is at least 500 years old. The „Chriesimärt“ is mentioned for the first time in 1627, the tradition of the „Crhiesigloggä“ can be traced back to 1711, the „Chriesisturm“ in a re-narration of 1886. The oldest cherry recipies passed on come from the second half of the 18th century. From the middle of the 19th century the Kirschwasser (cherry brandy) from the Zug-Rigi region became an important export article; industrial distilleries such as Fassbind in Arth SZ (1846), Dettling in Brunnen SZ (1867), Etter in Zug (1879) and Räber in Küssnacht a. R. SZ (1877) came into existence. In 1870 a few cherry farmers and distillators founded the „Kirschwasser-Gesellschaft in Zug“ (cherry brandy company) in the aim of improving the quality and the export of Zuger Kirsch. In 1915 the Zuger Kirschtorte was invented. Since 2007 a downright reversion to the „Chriesi“ (cherry) has taken place in the Zug-Rigi region, in the cantons of Zug, Schwyz and Luzern. In 2009 the association ZUGER & RIGI CHRIESI was initiated, in 2010 the ZUGER KIRSCHTORTEN GESELLSCHAFT (Kirsch cake corporation of Zug). In 2011 the „zuger-rigi-chriesi AG“ was created in the aim of implementing the regional development project „zuger-rigi-chriesi“. All these aggregations have set the objective to promote the „Chriesi“ in all its manifestations, make it an emblem of an entire region and to keep the 500 year old Kirsch culture alive in the Heart of Switzerland.

© 2017 Swiss PDO-PGI Association

topbacksitemapimpressum