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PGI Products

  • Bündnerfleisch PGI
    • Bündnerfleisch PGI

      The Bündnerfleisch PGI is not a member of the Swiss PDO-PGI Association.

      Product description:

      •Raw cured products, produced from meat from a cow's leg
      rectangular form
      purple colour

      Submission of the request: 08.10.1997
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 06.10.1999
      Registration: 29.09.2000


      Branch organisations

      Verband Bündner Fleischfabrikanten
      Obere Gasse 24
      Postfach 516
      CH-7002 Chur
      Tel. +41 (0)81 267 04 32
      Mail info@buendnerfleisch.org oder mani@bluewin.ch

      Web www.buendnerfleisch.org >

      Geographical Region

      The geographical region is defined by the borders of the canton of Grisons.

      Production

      The pieces of meat are trimmed of fat, tendons and vessels, before they are rubbed with a mix of salt, curing substances and spices. In addition to pepper, spices as garlic, ginger, bay leaves, allspice and others can be used. The exact composition of the spice mix is individual and differs according to the producer. Depending on the size of the pieces of meat the curing takes between five days and five weeks. The pieces of meat are then dried in the open air. The drying phase lasts 5 to 17 weeks. In this time the pieces of meat are repeatedly pressed in order to give the meat its rectangular form.

      History

      Air-dried meat produced in the canton of Grisons has a distinct curing aroma, emphasised by spicy notes and edible mould. Air-dried meat is traditionally preserved in a natural way in the mountain valleys of the Grisons canton. Suitable pieces of meat were dried in the Grisons as early as in the early Middle Ages.But it is only in the latest decenniums that air-dried meat manufacured in the canton of Grisons have become a speciality known beyond the borders of the canton.

  • Glarner Kalberwurst PGI
    • Glarner Kalberwurst PGI

      Product description:

      White scalded sausage which is boiled or grilled.
      Diameter 36-42 mm
      Weight 80-300 g
      produced from veal and pork, bacon and white bread (4-8%).

      Submission of the request: 15.12.2009
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 16.08.2011
      Registration: 01.12.2011


      Branch organisations

      Glarner Metzgermeisterverein
      Dr. Oswald Heer-Strasse 13
      8750 Glarus
      Tel. +41 (55) 640 19 67 oder +41 (55) 640 76 70
      Mail alberthoesli@bluewin.ch

      Geographical Region

      The geographical region is the canton of Glarus. Birth, fattening, slauthering and butchering of the cows and pigs take place exclusively in Switzerland. The white bread comes exclusively from the canton of Glarus.

      Production

      The meat, the bacon, ice, salt and spices are cut finely very quickly, then the white bread is added. This so-called « Brätmasse » (mix) is filled into cow intestines. The sausages are scalded in hot water and water steam at min. 68°C, then chilled with cold water. The Glarner Kalberwurst PGI distinguishes itself from comparable veal sausages particularly through the addition of white bread.

      History

      The oldest traceable evidence of the production of the Glarner Kalberwurst (veal sausage from Glarus) is about 150 years old. In the description "The canton of Glarus » from 1846 the authors already mention the Kalberwurst (veal sausage) as « belonging to the country of Glarus »). The addition of white bread is a traditional component of the recipe and can probably be traced back to the fact that in the hunger years at the beginning of the 19th century, the butchers of Glarus extended the meat, rare at the time, with old bread. The other guess is that through the addition of white bread, eggs and milk, a luxury version of the sausage was created. As the recipe of the scalded sausage enriched with bread was strongly contested at the beginning of the 20th century, the exact sausage content was defined by law in 1920 at the Landsgemeinde (gathering of the electorates). At the federal level, however, the Swiss Food Law of 1905 and the Food Ordinance of 1936 prohibited the addition of non-meat ingredients. After a long struggle the butchers of Glarus were allowed, from 1957 on, to produce the sausages according to a special permit specified by the Swiss Food Law according to the original Glarus recipe. The controversy over the Glarner Kalberwurst took an end in 1992, as the Swiss Food Law finally allowed addition of bread to the sausage (Wurstbrät).

  • Longeole PGI
    • Longeole PGI

      Product description:

      Raw sausage from pork, flavoured with fennel seeds.
      Diameter : 4–6 cm
      length : 18-20 cm
      weight : 250-650 g

      Submission of the request: 05.10.2006
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 02.04.2009
      Registration: 24.07.2009


      Branch organisations

      Communauté Interprofessionnelle de la Longeole (CIL), p.a. AGRIGENEVE
      rue des Sablières 15
      1217 Meyrin
      Tel. 022 939 03 10
      Fax 022 919 03 01
      Mail erard@agrigeneve.ch

      Web www.opage.ch >

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      Geographical Region

      The processing and production zone of the Longeole sausage is identical with the borders of the canton of Geneva. Birth, fattening, slaughtering and butchering of the pigs must take place in Switzerland.

      Production

      The Longeole PGI is produced from a mix of pork, throat or neck fat and raw rind. This mix is minced to 5-8 mm fine grains. Then whole fennel seeds, salt and white pepper are added as required ingredients and the butcher can also add white wine, garlic or other spices. The mix is stuffed into a cow's intestine, which is then closed with a red and yellow string (the colours of the Geneva blazon). Subsequently, the Longeole PGI must stay suspended for at least 12 hours in room temperature. The Longeole PGI has a firm consistency and a pleasant fennel aroma. As the rind is processed with the rest, the Longeole PGI has to simmer for rather long (between 2.5 and 3 hours) ; in return, it becomes very creamy.

      History

      The Longeole sausage came with the Huguenot refugees from the Dauphiné (1685-1705) to Geneva and this way into the local kitchens. Oral transmission says that the Longeole was invented by Père Longeot, a monk at the Pommier Abbey. He was said to have had the idea to mix a normal sausage paste with a handful of home-grown fennel seeds and rind. The Longeole PGI is a typical Geneva speciality and is often served with a gratin of thorny cardoon PDO.

  • Saucisse d'Ajoie PGI
    • Saucisse d'Ajoie PGI

      Product description:

      Smoked raw sausage product for boiling
      Diameter 32 to 35 mm
      weight 120-150 g
      produced from pork and bacon and maximum 10 per cent of beef.

      Submission of the request: 07.04.1997
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 30.07.2002
      Registration: 07.11.2002


      Branch organisations

      Association des Maîtres-Bouchers du District de Porrentruy
      Domon Philippe
      Place de la Liberté 1
      2942 Alle
      Tel. +41 (0)32 471 13 51
      Mail boucherie.domon@bluewin.ch

      Geographical Region

      The geographical region is the district of Porrentruy. Birth, fattening, slaughtering and butchering of the pigs and cows must take place exclusively in Switzerland.

      Production

      The entire mix ready to be filled at the moment the Saucisse d'Ajoie PGI is prepared consists of two thirds of pork, one third of bacon, and of maximum 10 per cent of minced beef, as an option. The addition of whole cumin grains at the moment of flavouring with pepper and garlic gives the speciality its special taste. The sausage mix is filled into a pig intestine. The intestine is not tied up with a string or metal clips, but knotted. Then the sausage is portioned through twisting of the intestine. Afterwards, the sausages are smoked over burning conifer wood in form of chips, sawdust or pieces of wood.

      History

      The traditional dish on Martin's Day belongs to the culinary heritage of Ajoie. In the week before Martin's Day the farmers in the region slaughter the pigs and process as much of the meat as possible. One of the products obtained this way is the Saucisse d'Ajoie PGI, which is produced according to a traditional recipe. The smoking is also part of the tradition : Today still old smokehouses dating back to the 17th century can be visited at a few particular farms. The designation « Saucisse d'Ajoie » was used for the first time 1920 : At that time, a group of butchers gave the house sausage in their region this name to distinguish it from similar products.

  • Saucisse aux choux vaudoise PGI
    • Saucisse aux choux vaudoise PGI

      Product description:

      Smoked raw sausage product on the basis of pork, rind and white cabbage
      Diameter 38-44 mm
      weight 300-400 g

      Submission of the request: 04.12.1997
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 15.09.2000
      Registration: 11.10.2004


      Branch organisations

      Association Charcuterie Vaudoise AOP-IGP
      c/o Dr. Didier Blanc, c/o SanoVet
      Pré au Comte 4
      1844 Villeneuve
      Tel. +41 (0)79 3375139
      Mail didier.blanc@bluewin.ch

      Web www.charcuterie-vaudoise.ch >

      These specialties can be purchased here

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      Geographical Region

      The geographical region is the canton of Vaud. Birth, fattening and slaughtering of the pigs take place exclusively in Switzerland.

      Production

      The Saucisse aux choux vaudoise PGI (white cabbage sausage from the canton of Vaud) is made of cuts of meat, besides cabbage, and produced from pigs fattened in Switzerland.The white cabbage is blanched, then pressed. When the meat is selected, tendons and other unwanted parts must be removed. When the meat is amassed, the grain averages between 3 mm (rind) and 5 mm (meat). The main spices are table salt and pepper. Als additional flavours garlic, coriander, nutmeg, mace, cloves and aniseed are possible. The mixture is kneaded and stuffed into natural beef casings. Afterwards the Saucisse aux choux vaudoise PGI is left to drain. It can be simmered and then smoked cold at a temperature of between 18 and 28 degrees. The smoke develops through the burning of sawdust and a mixture of untreated conifer wood and hardwood. Minimum smoking time is 24 hours.

      History

      The origins of the Saucisse aux choux vaudoise are told in a legend from 879. At this time, the German Emperor Charles the Fat and two of his nephews met in Orbe in order to regularise inheritance issues. The monarchs and their entourage stayed in Orbe for several weeks and during this time they lived to a large extent from the products of the royal manor. As meat became rare, legend tells that a townsman had the idea to extend the sausage meat with white cabbage. In any case, the roots of the Saucisse aux choux vaudoise PGI date back to medieval times, when smoking and boiling of sausage products were first practised.

  • Saucisson neuchâtelois PGI, Saucisse neuchâteloise PGI
    • Saucisson neuchâtelois PGI, Saucisse neuchâteloise PGI

      Product description:

      Smoked raw sausage for boiling on the base of pork
      Diameter 40-60 mm
      weight 200-600 g

      Submission of the request: 13.05.1997
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 24.02.2003
      Registration: 06.06.2003


      Branch organisations

      Association neuchâteloise des maîtres bouchers
      Rue de la Serre 4
      CH-2001 Neuchâtel
      Tel. +41 (0)32 934 30 10
      Mail pierre@montandon.ch

      Geographical Region

      The geographical region of processing and preparation is the canton of Neuchâtel. Birth, fattening, slaughtering and butchering of the pigs take place exclusively in Switzerland.

      Production

      The sausage mix prepared for the production of the Saucisson neuchâtelois PGI, resp. the Saucisse neuchâteloise PGI consists of two thirds of lean pork and one third of bacon. Boiled rind can be added, as long as the required proportion of bacon and meat is respected. Pepper, garlic and nitrate salting mix are the only flavours permitted. The kneaded mixture is filled into cow intestines, whereby central intestines are used for the Saucisson and ring casings for the Saucisse. Stuffed into the intestines, drained and suspended on a string for at least 12 hours in room temperature. Subsequently, the sausages are smoked cold.

      History

      The Saucisson neuchâtelois PGI and the Saucisse neuchâteloise PGI originate from rural tradition of domestic sausage production. The designations ‘Saucisse neuchâteloise' and ‘Saucission neuchâtelois' were first used toward the end of the 19th century. The production method is, however, older than these designations, as it is based on the traditional procedure used for preserving pork, i.e. the use of sodium nitrate, cold smoking and the know-how of the butcher. Both specialities belong to ancient Neuchâtel customs : the Torrée. Thereby a big fire is lit. As soon as embers are sufficient, the sausages, wrapped up in parchment and newspaper, are embeddied and cooked in the embers for 30-40 minutes.

  • St. Galler Bratwurst PGI
    • St. Galler Bratwurst PGI

      Product description:

      White scalded sausage, which is cooked and served roasted or grilled.

      Submission of the request: 09.07.2003
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 02.08.2007
      Registration: 10.10.2008


      Branch organisations

      St Galler Bratwurst
      Rheinhofstrasse 11
      9465 Salez
      Tel. 058 228 24 29
      Mail wurst@sg-bratwurst.ch

      Web www.sg-bratwurst.ch >

      Geographical Region

      The St. Galler Bratwurst PGI, or the Olma Bratwurst, is produced in the cantons of St. Gallen, Appenzell Innerrhoden, Appenzell Ausserrhoden and Thurgau. Birth, fattening and slaughtering of the pigs, the meat of whose is used for the production of the St. Galler Bratwurst, must take place in Switzerland or in the Principality of Liechtenstein.

      Production

      The St. Galler Bratwurst PGI or the Olma Bratwurst is produced from a mix of pork and veal, as well as milk (from Switzerland or Liechtenstein). Added to this is salt, some pepper, mace (shell of the muscat nut), as well as other spices, according to the recipe of the master butcher (cardamom, coriander, ginger, nutmeg, onion, leek, celery, lemon). The mix is minced to regularity and then stuffed into a pig intestine. The sausage is then boiled at a temperature of 72 degrees, to be quickly chilled.

      History

      In 1438, first reference was made to a Bratwurst in the statutes of the Butchers' Guild of St. Gallen. Therein it is stipulated that this sausage is produced from veal, bacon, spices and fresh milk. The latter also explains the white colour of the sausage. Since then, the sausage recipe has not really changed, the master butchers, however, can interpret it to their taste, as long as they stick with specifications. Today, three fourths of the Swiss know the St. Galler Bratwurst PGI, also often under the name of Olma Bratwurst, which was created for the traditional Autumn Fair in St. Gallen. The Olma Bratwurst, though, weighs 160 g compared to the 100-110 g weight that a traditional St. Gallen Bratwurst PGI brings on the scale. Attention, in St. Gallen you never add mustard to the sausage, as it does not need this flavour enhancer. It is also served with an onion soup and rösti.

  • Saucisson vaudois PGI
    • Saucisson vaudois PGI

      Product description:

      Smoked raw sausage product based on pork
      Diameter 50-65 mm
      length 15 bis 20 cm
      The sausage ist boiled or dried and enjoyed raw.

      Submission of the request: 04.12.1997
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 15.09.2000
      Registration: 11.10.2004


      Branch organisations

      Association Charcuterie Vaudoise AOP-IGP
      c/o Dr. Didier Blanc, c/o SanoVet
      Pré au Comte 4
      1844 Villeneuve
      Tel. +41 (0)79 337 51 39
      Mail didier.blanc@bluewin.ch

      Web www.charcuterie-vaudoise.ch >

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      Geographical Region

      The geographical region is the canton of Vaud. Birth, fattening and slaughtering of the pigs take place exclusively in Switzerland.

      Production

      The Saucisson vaudois PGI is produced from pork. Lean meat and bacon must be proportioned 3 to 2. The pieces of meat are carefully selected and minced. Main spices are table salt and pepper. Other possible spices are garlic, coriander, wine yeast and white wine. The mix is kneaded and then stuffed into pig intestines. After draining the Saucisson vaudois PGI is dried. Smoking is done with cold smoke. The smoke develops when sawdust or a mix of untreated conifer wood and hardwood is burned. Minimum smoking time is 24 hours.

      History

      The origin of the Saucisson vaudois dates back to the Middle Ages, when sausage products were smoked and boiled in the canton of Vaud for the first time. Subsequently, the Saucisson became important as food for the Vaud population. Pork came on the table mainly in its smoked form or as Saucisse and Saucisson. The farmers usually ate meat five times a week, mostly pork. The Saucisson vaudois PGI is mentioned in several publications describing daily life of the Vaud inhabitants and the meat production traditions. It is different from other sausages in the way that it is manufactured exclusively from pork and a pig's intestine is used as casing.

  • Walliser Trockenfleisch PGI
    • Walliser Trockenfleisch PGI

      Product description:

      Salted and air dried beef to be eaten raw
      round or rectangular form
      , even, purple colour

      Submission of the request: 15.02.1998
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 18.10.2002
      Registration: 29.01.2003


      Branch organisations

      Association des Producteurs de Viande Séchée du Valais IGP
      Case postale 96
      CH1964 Conthey
      Tel. +41 (0)27 345 40 10
      Mail cvagri@agrivalais.ch

      Web www.trockenfleischwallis.ch >

      These specialties can be purchased here

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      Geographical Region

      The geographical region of production is the canton of Wallis. Birth, fattening, slaughtering and butchering of the cows take place exclusively in Switzerland.

      Production

      The raw material used for the production of Walliser Trockenfleisch PGI (air-dried meat of the canton of Wallis) consists of pieces of cow's leg having a moderate fat content, without being too fat. Before salting the pieces are carefully cut up and trimmed from fat and tendons. The cut up pieces are subsequently pickled in a mixture of salt, red colouring, spices and herbs. After salting the pieces are usually washed and then suspended on bars to dry. Depending on the size of the pieces the drying phase lasts between 5 and 16 weeks. During drying process a layer of edible mould forms on the surface of each separate piece.

      History

      Because of the harsh climate in the Alpine region non-perishable food supplies for the population were of great importance in the past. So the curing and drying technique was originated thanks to the ingenuity of the shepherds. In the literature air dried meat is first mentioned in the œuvre of Anton Gattlen (1544-1550). With the stepwise emerging purpose of domestic production and the development of tourism the designation ‘Walliser Trockenfleisch' (air dried meat from the canton of Wallis) was born, defining the speciality that was produced from the best leg pieces. The production of Wallis air dried meat was professionalised and is today in the hands of qualified craftsmen. Their joint know-how shows the experience acquired over centuries in Wallis.

  • Walliser Trockenspeck PGI
    • Walliser Trockenspeck PGI

      Product description:

      PGI (Protected Geographical Indication) Valais bacon consists of the breast of pigs raised exclusively in Switzerland.

      Submission of the request: 25.04.2014
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 02.10.2015
      Registration: 22.05.2015


      Branch organisations

      Association des Producteurs de Viande Séchée du Valais IGP
      Case postale 96
      CH1964 Conthey
      Tel. +41 (0)27 345 40 10
      Mail cvagri@agrivalais.ch

      Web www.trockenfleischwallis.ch >

      These specialties can be purchased here

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      Geographical Region

      The geographic area in which Valais bacon PGI is processed is the Canton of Valais. The birth, raising, slaughter and cutting of the pigs take places exclusively in Switzerland.

      Production

      The breast of the animal is used for the production of bacon. Cut into rectangular slabs, the pieces are first rubbed with a mixture of salt, pepper, spices and aromatic plants, the details of which are a jealously guarded secret of each producer. The pieces are then placed in brine in large tanks in a cool place, where they become impregnated with the curing mixture for several days. The drying phase follows: the slabs of bacon are hung from a string in a cool and well ventilated spot. The minimal duration of the processing of the bacon, including the salting, drying and aging phases, is four weeks. In the course of this drying process, the bacon loses at least 30 % of its weight, compared to the fresh product. Pressed several times during the drying phase in order to give them their rectangular shape, the slices of bacon have a final thickness of about 3 cm. Valais bacon PGI is never smoked.

      History

      The practice of drying meat products goes back to at least the 16th century in Valais. At that time, though, pork production was not yet well developed in Valais. At the end of the 19th century, this situation changed. Many peasant families raised pork for their own use and processed it themselves, ensuring its preservation through drying. The tradition that consisted of "killing the pig" in every family, at the end of autumn or beginning of winter, remained very much alive until after the Second World War. Until the middle of the 20th century, the entire pig – and not just the ham – was salted in a wood vat, then dried if possible in a raccard, a type of chalet used to store food in the alpine pastures of Valais, open to the cool, dry air of the mountains. Starting in the 1950s, ham underwent the same evolution as dried beef. Household production declined, while professional production developed thanks to the know-how acquired over generations.

  • Walliser Rohschinken PGI
    • Walliser Rohschinken PGI

      Product description:

      PGI (Protected Geographical Indication) Valais raw ham consists of pieces of ham from the hindquarters of pigs raised exclusively in Switzerland.

      Submission of the request: 25.04.2014
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 02.10.2015
      Registration: 22.05.2015


      Branch organisations

      Association des Producteurs de Viande Séchée du Valais IGP
      Case postale 96
      CH1964 Conthey
      Tel. +41 (0)27 345 40 10
      Mail cvagri@agrivalais.ch

      Web www.trockenfleischwallis.ch >

      These specialties can be purchased here

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      Geographical Region

      The geographic area in which Valais raw ham PGI is processed is the Canton of Valais. The birth, raising, slaughter and cutting of the pigs take places exclusively in Switzerland.

      Production

      The pieces of meat are first rubbed with a mixture of salt, spices and aromatic herbs, then chilled. Thanks to the meat's juice, a brine forms. When removed from the brine, the pieces are usually packed in a stocking or net and then stewed for several days. The actual drying and the pressing follow. Pressing is intended to open the pores of the meat and give the piece a uniform shape. The minimal duration of the processing of raw hams, including the salting, drying and aging phases, varies between six to ten weeks. Drying sometimes takes place outdoors. Producers who still have a raccard, a type of chalet used to store food in the alpine pastures of Valais, expose the meat to the cool, dry air of higher elevations. Today, though, drying usually takes place in premises with controlled temperature and humidity. The loss of weight during this process varies according to the fat content but always reaches at least 35%. IGP Valais raw ham is never smoked.

      History

      The practice of drying meat products goes back to at least the 16th century in Valais. At that time, though, pork production was not yet well developed in Valais. At the end of the 19th century, this situation changed. Many peasant families raised pork for their own use and processed it themselves, ensuring its preservation through drying. The tradition that consisted of "killing the pig" in every family, at the end of autumn or beginning of winter, remained very much alive until after the Second World War. Until the middle of the 20th century, the entire pig – and not just the ham – was salted in a wood vat, then dried if possible in a raccard, a type of chalet used to store food in the alpine pastures of Valais, open to the cool, dry air of the mountains. Starting in the 1950s, ham underwent the same evolution as dried beef. Household production declined, while professional production developed thanks to the know-how acquired over generations.

  • Zuger Kirschtorte IGP
    • Zuger Kirschtorte IGP

      Product description:

      Die Zuger Kirschtorte hat eine runde Form mit einem Durchmesser von mindestens 8 cm und die maximale Höhe beträgt 45 mm.

      Submission of the request: 18.07.2013
      Official publication through the Federal Office for Agriculture FOA: 24.03.2015
      Registration: 06.03.2015

      Branch organisations

      Zuger Kirschtorten Gesellschaft, Verein zur Förderung der Zuger Kirschtorte
      Geschäftsstelle, Postfach 4716, CH-6304 Zug

      Tel.
      Mail bruno.heini@zktg.ch

      Web www.zuger-kirschtorten-gesellschaft.ch/ >

      Geographical Region

      Die Herstellung der Zuger Kirschtorte erfolgt ausschliesslich im Kanton Zug.

      Production

      Für die Herstellung dürfen ausschliesslich Zuger Kirsch oder Rigi Kirsch AOP verwendet werden. Die Zuger Kirschtorte hat einen typischen Kirschgeschmack und hat einen intensiven Kirschgeruch. Neben dem weltbekannten Zuger Kirsch AOP ist die Zuger Kirschtorte IGP die bekannteste und beliebteste Spezialität aus der Region Zug und wird heute in die ganze Welt verschickt.

      History

      Der Konditor Heiri Höhn erfand 1915 die «Zuger Kirschtorte». Inspiriert wurde er von den berühmten Kirschwassern aus der Region und durch die unmittelbare Nachbarschaft zu bekannten Kirschbrennereien in der Stadt Zug. Höhn liess die Torte schützen und gewann in der Folge unzählige nationale und internationale Auszeichnungen und Goldmedaillen. 1943 wurde der Betrieb von der Familie Treichler übernommen, welche die Firma 2004 an die «Treichler Zuger Kirschtorten AG» verkaufte. Charlie Chaplin, Audrey Hepburn, die Fürstenfamilie von Liechtenstein oder der britische Premier Winston Churchill gehörten zu den Geniessern der Zuger Chriesiwassertorte. In den Vatikan werden regelmässig Torten verschickt, die für das katholische Oberhaupt bestimmt sind, Papst Franziskus ist ein erklärter Fan des Zuger Kirschgebäcks. Die Zuger Kirschtorte gehört zum «kulinarischen Erbe der Schweiz» und ist ein wichtiges Stück Zuger Kulturgut.

© 2017 Swiss PDO-PGI Association

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